Temperature sensors: now powered by Raspberry Pi

The Weather section on my website is now powered by my Raspberry Pi, instead of my Ninja Block! \o/

Almost exactly three years ago, I started having my Ninja Block send its temperature data to my website (prior to that, I was manually pulling the data from the Ninja Blocks API and didn’t have any historical record of it). Ninja Blocks the company went bust in 2015, and there was some stuff in the Ninja Blocks software that relied on their cloud platform to work and I ended up with no weather data for a couple of days because the Ninja Block couldn’t talk to the cloud platform. I ended up hacking at it and the result was this very simple Node.js application as a replacement for their software. It always felt a bit crap, though, because if the hardware itself died I’d be stuck; yes, it was all built on “open hardware” but I didn’t know enough about it all to be able to recreate it. I’d ordered a Raspberry Pi 3 in June last year, intending on replacing the Ninja Block and it’s sometimes-unreliable wireless temperature sensors with something newer and simpler and hard-wired, but I found there was a frustrating lack of solid information regarding something that on the surface seemed quite simple.

I’ve finally gotten everything up and running, the Ninja Block has been shut down, and I’ve previously said I’d write up exactly what I did. So here we are!

Components needed

  • Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+
  • AM2302 wired temperature-humidity sensor (or two of them in my case)
  • Ethernet cable of the appropriate length to go from the Pi to the sensor
  • 6x “Dupont” female to either male or female wires (eBay was the best bet for these, just search for “dupont female”, and it only needs to be female on one end as the other end is going to be chopped off)
  • 1.5mm heatshrink tubing
  • Soldering iron and solder
  • Wire stripper (this one from Jaycar worked brilliantly, it automatically adjusts itself to diameter of the insulation)

Process

  1. Cut the connectors off one end of the dupont cables, leaving the female connector still there, and strip a couple of centimetres of insulation off.
  2. Strip the outermost insulation off both ends of the ethernet cable, leaving a couple of centimetres of the internal twisted pairs showing.
  3. Untwist three of the pairs and strip the insulation off them, then twist them back together again into their pairs.
  4. Chop off enough heatshrink tubing to cover the combined length of the exposed ethernet plus dupont wire, plus another couple of centimetres, and feed each individual dupont wire through the tubing (there should be three separate bits of tubing, one for each wire).
  5. Solder each dupont wire together with one of the twisted pairs of ethernet cable, then move the heatshrink tubing up over the soldered section and use a hairdryer or kitchen blowtorch to activate the tubing and have it shrink over the soldered portion to create a nice seal.
  6. Repeat this feed-heatshrink-tubing/solder-wire/activate-heatshrink process again but with the cables that come out of the temperature sensor (ideally you should be using the same red/yellow/black-coloured dupont cables to match the ones that come out of the sensor itself, to make it easier to remember which is which).
  7. Install Raspbian onto an SD card and boot and configure the Pi.
  8. Using this diagram as a reference, plug the red (power) cable from the sensor into Pin 2 (the 5V power), the yellow one into Pin 7 (GPIO 4, the data pin), and the black one into Pin 6 (the ground pin).

AdaFruit has a Python library for reading data from the sensor, I’m using the node-dht-sensor library for Node.js myself. You can see the full code I’m using here (it’s a bit convoluted because I haven’t updated the API endpoint on my website yet and it’s still expecting the same data format as the Ninja Block was sending).

I’d found a bunch of stuff about needing a “pull-up” resistor when connecting temperature sensors, but the AM2302 page on adafruit.com says “There is a 5.1K resistor inside the sensor connecting VCC and DATA so you do not need any additional pullup resistors”, and indeed, everything is working a treat!

2 thoughts on “Temperature sensors: now powered by Raspberry Pi”

  1. I tried these instructions, but replaced the Pi with a chunk of motherboard I found in a cupboard and the solder with some gum I had. 1/5 stars

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